Tuesday, February 5, 2013

HP Chromebook

Well, "the big news" is the new HP Chromebook, endorsing the Google tablet with its own version.  Here's the vaunted TouchPad replacement?  Wags quickly noted that "it's a mixed bag" with bigger screen, more battery life, and a higher price.  Looks good in the press photo though.

Remember when HP tried to remarket Motorola phones, and then Apple phones.  Recall HP's camera?

Especially remember the TouchPad?

Kind of a letdown?  Or worse?

3 comments:

Andrew S said...

The worst thing about the HP Chromebook is that it isn't even competitive as a Chromebook. It's at least $100 more expensive than most other Chromebook models (Lenovo fails even worse on this point, however), and it has worse battery life than some of the cheaper options -- for a device that people simply expect to surf the internet and run google docs.

Me said...

When HP's first camera came out (HP was in the camera market for about , it was truly revolutionary. The introduction of the camera was coupled with a simultaneous introduction of the 'PhotoSmart' printers. IMHO, these products actually made digital photography more acceptable to the masses than it had ever been before.

The camera, while clunky to use, had tech specs that were nothing short of amazing for the time.

I was privileged to see the the breadboards and a number of test shots at HPLabs about 6 months before the PhotoSmart introduction.

The problem with the digital camera market was that it matured very quickly -- the traditional (Japanese) camera makers started ramping on digital photography and left HP in the dust.

Of course, HP didn't help matters much because the marketing view on digital photography was that it just another way to move more ink cartridges.

--
Steve Witten

Me said...

Chuck -- Don't use the first one I sent...some incomplete thoughts there (mind working faster than fingers :-) Here's one that makes more sense... -- sw

----- snip, snip

When HP's first camera came out in 2001 or so (HP was in the camera market for about 6 or 7 years), it was truly revolutionary. The introduction of the camera was coupled with a simultaneous introduction of the 'PhotoSmart' printers. IMHO, these products actually made digital photography more acceptable to the masses than it had ever been before.

The camera, while clunky to use, had tech specs that were nothing short of amazing for the time.

I was privileged to see the the breadboards and a number of test shots at HPLabs about 6 months before the PhotoSmart introduction.

The problem with the digital camera market was that it matured very quickly -- the traditional (Japanese) camera makers started ramping on digital photography and left HP in the dust.

Of course, HP didn't help matters much because the marketing view on digital photography was that it just another way to move more ink cartridges. By the time this mind set subsided and HP realized that digital cameras were consumer products and not hobbyist toys, Canon, Olympus, Nikon etc. had eaten HP's lunch.
--
Steve Witten